November 2011 Exhibitions

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Seventh Annual Alternative Processes
Competition Winners

 

First Place
Barbara Ciurej & Lindsay Lochman
Dill Wee, Cyanotype

This year’s Alternative Processes Competition presents the winning images of photographers from across the United States. The images that were submitted for this competition represent a wide range of alternative methods that can include beeswax paper negative, Cyanotype, Van Dyke Brown, platinum/palladium, gum dichromate, gold toned salt print, tintype, and ziatype. This year’s juror was gallerist, educator and photographer Michael Paris Mazzeo. As an educator, Mazzeo has long been a practitioner of antiquarian processes; he’s taught at the School of Visual Arts, ICP, New Jersey City University, the Center for Photography at Woodstock, and the Pennsylvania College of Art and Design.

The top three winners are:
First Place: Barbara Ciurej & Lindsay Lochman, Chicago, IL
Second Place: Denyse Murphy, Haverhill, MA
Third Place: David Zimmerman, Taos, NM

Blue Ladies

Dill Weed, Cyanotype © Barbara Ciurej & Lindsay Lochman

Second Place
Denyse Murphy
Heartflower 1

second_place

Heartflower 1 © Denyse Murphy

Third Place
David Zimmerman
Untitled 

third_place

Untitled © David Zimmerman

Souvenirs and The Inevitable

Stephanie Lyn Slate

 

Stephanie Lyn Slate is exhibiting two bodies of work; one is entitled Souvenirs and the other is The Inevitable. She explains, “Souvenirs, my newest series, serves as a form of therapy to help me understand the beauty in boredom. I use a camera to pry into my closest relationships and most personal thoughts, and shoot the different dynamics between my husband, our family dogs, and myself. The goal is to better understand what is important in our relationships, which oftentimes is the absolute beauty in the simple and boring; a dog sitting in beautiful light on a couch, a walk in the woods, the elegance of nudity, or even napping. I printed it in platinum/palladium to slow me down and give me time to form a relationship with the image.”

In The Inevitable, Slate explores the delicate boundaries between the repulsive and beautiful, life and death. She says, “My platinum images in this series portray withered carcasses or involve self portraits taken in decomposing environments. In each image, the cycle of nature is depicted; that which is born eventually turns back into earth. A tranquil figure will eventually turn to bone and dust.”

alabamainthebrownroom

Alabama in the Brown Room © Stephanie Lyn Slate