Current Exhibition

SohoPhoto Gallery
15 White Street
New York, NY 10013

Gallery hours:
Wednesday to Sunday
1:00pm - 6:00pm
(and by appointment)

212.226.8571
Contact SohoPhoto

Enhancing Lives through Photography since 1941

 

—Josephine Herrick

Photograph © Josephine Herrick

In April

Soho Photo Gallery in April features previously unpublished work from the Josephine Herrick Project’s path-breaking experiment using the art of photography to help World War II veterans heal from their wounds, physical and psychological.  Also on display will be photographs exploring diverse topics—the formation of New Mexico’s landscape, current events in El Salvador, classic portraiture and patterns abstracted from everyday reality.  

Exhibition Dates: April 2, 2014 — May 3, 2014

Opening Reception: Tuesday, April 1, 2014, from 6pm to 8pm

 Download Press Release

 

The Early Years

Josephine Herrick Project Enhancing Lives through Photography since 1941

 

These never before seen photographs, taken by Josephine Herrick, the photographers she trained, and wounded veterans during WWII, represent photography as a healing art. From their hospital beds, young men were given hope, inspiration and photographic skills. Today, 72 years later, the Josephine Herrick Project continues to reach communities in-need with free programs combining photography and service.

APRIL_Josephine Herrick Project

© Josephine Herrick

A New Mexico Portfolio 

John Custodio

 

“New Mexico is a land of contrasts—from ancient civilizations to the development of the atomic bomb. It’s also a land rich in Spanish and Native American cultures and spectacular landscapes. This exhibit features a selection of photographs that range from the formation of river gorges and sand dunes millions of years ago, to churches built during the Spanish Colonial period, to examples of architecture in the heyday of railroad travel and at the beginning of the automobile era.”

Lamy, New Mexico

© John Custodio

Portraits

George Greenstein

 

  “Evolution has made our faces objects of intense interest. Social animals that we are, we study each other’s expressions. I often find myself gazing upon portraits, seeking the essential natures of their subjects. In my own photographic work, I want each of my portraits to tell a story. But what is the story they tell? What are my subjects feeling? Who are these people? Sometimes I cannot decide.”

APRIL_George Greenstein

© George Greenstein

Patterns

Jay Matusow

 

 “I make photographic images that take my predilection for recording the world’s geometry a step further, by extracting beautiful forms, shapes, and linear relationships from ordinary scenes and objects, and exploiting the power of digital manipulation. In each photograph I’ve recorded something which has strong linear and textural elements, and used those elements repeatedly, overlaying, distorting, and sometimes amplifying them, in order to share my state of mind.

A swatch of the original un-altered image is displayed adjacent to each work.”

APRIL_Jay Matusow

© Jay Matusow

Democracy Matters…in El Salvador

Paul Stetzer

 

“These images tell the story of a delegation of international observers who went to witness the February 2, 2014 presidential election. CISPES (the Committee in Solidarity with the People of El Salvador) trained the delegates in the current political, social, and economic conditions there as well as what to look for. And then Salvadorans voted—in a fair, clean, and transparent election. Democracy matters.”

APRIL_Paul S Stetzer

© Paul Stetzer

Street Life

Scot Surbeck

 

“The streets of New York City bristle with energy. The surroundings influence us, make us who we are. Yet we also make the city. The emotions and feelings in this dense urban oasis flow from the daily rubbing of shoulders of millions of people, and the city’s physical structure responds in kind. The complete reality is a combination, a self-referential loop–we are the city, the city is us, we are the city, the city is us. Almost every day I take my camera and immerse myself in that loop, a witness to this city, these people and this moment in time.”

New York Dolls

© Scot Surbeck