Upcoming Exhibition

SohoPhoto Gallery
15 White Street
New York, NY 10013

Gallery hours:
Wednesday to Sunday
1:00pm - 6:00pm
(and by appointment)

212.226.8571
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On the Gypsy Row

—Rita Baunok

Photograph © Rita Baunok

Opening our new season, Soho Photo Gallery presents seven solo shows.

EXHIBITION DATES: September 3, 2014 – October 2, 2014 
OPENING RECEPTION: Thursday, September 4, 2014, from 6pm to 8pm. 

Everyone is welcome.

Download press Release

On the Gypsy Row

Rita Baunok

 
 

“Romani first appeared in Hungary in the 14th century, fleeing the conquering Turks in the Balkans. Since they were thought to be refugees from Little Egypt in the south of Greece, they are still known by the term ‘Gypsy’ today. Their population forms the largest ethnic minority in Hungary. The majority of the Hungarian Romas still live segregated on the ‘Gypsy Row’– on the last streets of the villages and towns.”

USING 01 On The Gypsy Row © Rita Baunok #19

© Rita Baunok

Everything Is Broken

Mike Cullen

 

“This collection of images reflects the internal tension I’ve been experiencing of late. To be sure, I’ve  got no right to complain (heck, I have a show of my photographs on the wall of Soho Photo Gallery). But unemployment, depression and all the attendant emotions that come along for the ride…well, sometimes it feels like everything is broken.

 The title of the show is borrowed from a Bob Dylan song of the same name.” 

Cullen-EverythingIsBrokenSPGShow

© Mike Cullen

Congolese Wrestlers – Kinshasa 2010-2013 

Colin Delfosse

 
 

“I was hypnotized when I saw it for the first time.  In the dark and muddy streets of Matete district, the atmosphere was warm and full of music.  The boxing ring trembled as fighters collided.  But what struck me more than anything was the theatrical performance. Beyond the fetish and other magic objects, the Congolese wrestlers were authentic showmen whose magic dance and physical exploits held the public spellbound.  I was on the edge of my seat.” 

Congolese Wreslers

© Colin Delfosse

The Altered Landscape:New Humanoid Constructions 

Ruth Formanek

 

“A photo of a landscape may or may not look like its original. The landscape can’t be changed but its image can be converted to whatever you choose. The landscapes in this show of 12 digital color photographs-mostly of Utah’s rocky mountains and Florida’s lakes-playfully and sometimes whimsically express something suggested by their original shape or color. The original image becomes a means to an unknown end, sometimes with unconscious themes.”

Ruth Formanek_DSC_1599.arches .ONLY THIS  copy

© Ruth Formanek

Waiting Room: Kay

Ellen Jacob

 

“Life and death, the fragility of human connections, the certainty of the end. We know death is waiting; yet we persist. This work explores the waiting, the persistence and the places, largely separated from life, where we live while dying. Waiting Room is a photographic installation about Kay, 54, dying of cancer.  Through Kay’s story at the boundary between life and death, I tell the story of all of us.”

EllenJacob_WaitingRoom-Kay

© Ellen Jacob

Stairways

Jay Matusow

 

“I had never given much thought as to why steps and stairs seem to work their way into my photographs, until I assembled this collection. I suppose I like the fact that stairways ascend so hopefully, and that they have all those neat, organized right angles. They are purposefully demanding, literally and metaphorically taking us to a new level, but they also keep us honest, by requiring us to do a little work to get there.”

Sept_01 steps © Jay Matusow 2014 climbing

© Jay Matusow

Street Seen

Scot Surbeck

 

“I take pictures of people on the streets on New York City, almost every day, all year round. I look for those fleeting moments when human emotions and physical surroundings combine to create stories of joy, pathos, absurdity, contradiction, anger and humor. In this show — like my two shows earlier this year — I continue to explore and celebrate the street life of New York City.”

Scot_Surbeck_Man and tug of war

© Scot Surbeck